Photography

#COVID-19
#female portrait
#home
#self-portrait

Isabella Lanave (@isalanave) is a freelance photographer based in Curitiba, Brazil. “I think this quarantine is more physically isolating than socially isolating for me. I live with friends and this is a time to coexist. Time to stop and listen, to find out more.”

Since being quarantined inside her home in Buenos Aires, Lucía Morón has struggled with insomnia. “I have not been sleeping well and there are even days when I cannot seem to find the energy to get out of bed,” she says. As a way to manage her difficult moments, Morón has been documenting her uneasiness. “Photographing helps me to externalize and exorcise my inner fears, nightmares, and anxieties,” she says. “It has become a way of escape in which to express myself during (these) hard and lonely times.”

Morón’s joined more than 400 other womxn with similar practices on a collaborative project that’s helping to capture the mundane, monotonous, and worrisome moments in their lives. Organized by photographers Charlotte Schmitz and Hannah Yoon, The Journal is an extension of Women Photograph, which is an initiative led by Daniella Zalcman to elevate visual journalists who identify as non-binary or women.

While many photographs during the last few weeks have focused on hospitals, essential supplies, and frontline workers, The Journal retreats from the traumatic coverage in favor of intimacy. “Our collective photo project brings nuance to the way the current pandemic is being covered as we turn the camera on ourselves, our families, and the private space,” organizers said. It encompasses work from womxn in more than 80 countries and ensures that marginalized voices have a platform as freelance and media budgets are slashed globally. 

Morón’s image (shown below) is black and white and depicts a single arm and leg at the left edge of the frame. It corresponds to her feelings of being “‘submerged’ in bed. As if I was trapped or being ‘eaten’ by my own bed,” she says. The puffy sheets resemble a dreamy, floating cloud, linking the image more directly to her insomnia.

While Morón has pivoted inward as a way to cope with her private emotions and feelings, though, other participants describe an experience that centers on their subject matter. For photojournalist Nyimas Laula, turning the camera to herself poses many difficulties because she typically focuses on others’ stories, not her own.

As a photojournalist, the biggest part of my job is listening to people that I’ll be photographing. My work has always been speaking about others, whether it’s addressing issues that I deeply care about or extension of voices from people that yet to be heard. In this isolation, I’m pushed to point the camera to myself, no one to ask, no one to speak to, other than myself. I constrain myself to this voluntary isolation out of responsibility to help contain the spread of the virus. I find myself deeply disoriented by that.

Now confined to her home in Indonesia, Laula has been capturing her surroundings and otherwise private life. She talks about an inner impulse she feels guiding her. “I’ve been photographing things around me, out of intuition, without any particular reason or stories. As if I’m trying to describe the complexity of feelings that I experience during isolation,” she says. “This time, I’m listening to myself, rediscovering myself. It might tell something about myself that I didn’t know before.”

Each week, The Journal’s curators announce a theme like nature, connection, or self-portrait that 8-10 participants from different countries work on together. Some shoot the images, while others provide creative guidance or edit. “As these relationships form, we can see important visual stories emerging, bringing representation to women and their stories from all over the world,” organizers said. Photographers are separated into intentionally diverse groups to ensure a variety of perspectives. 

As the project continues, Morón hopes to direct conversations around the ongoing pandemic to new spaces. “We can find a certain relief from this difficult situation by changing its images. It’s like a trap. I think that many people will feel identified with our stories of quarantine,” she writes.

To see the growing collection of global dispatches, follow The Journal on Instagram.

 

Lucía Morón (@ph.lumo) is a freelance photographer and architect based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. April 2, 2020. “Self-portrait in my bedroom.”

Karolin Klüppel (@karolinklueppel) is a freelance photographer and visual artist based in Berlin. “Since the lockdown in Berlin, I have started to create self-portraits of myself and my family. I am looking for an image that creates a new world and is free of time and space.”

María Gutierrez (@maru.gut) is a freelance photographer based in Argentina. “Since the second day of the quarantine, I live with a strong contracture in my body. I made this self-portrait while I was taking a hot shower to calm the pain. From this body ache that I am feeling, I´m doing these photos.”

Hannah Yoon (@hanloveyoon) is a freelance photographer based in Philadelphia. “I moved into a new house so I’m learning how to do basic things on my own like put up curtains.”

Haruka Sakaguchi (@hsakag) is a freelance photographer based in New York. “This is me in multiple exposures trying to stay busy and productive throughout the day, so my mind doesn’t wander off to dark places.”

Jessica Pons (@ponsphotos) is an Argentinean-American photographer and director based in Los Angeles. Los Angeles, March 17, 2020: I made this self-portrait at home at the beginning of the quarantine, with great uncertainty about the future.

Khadija Farah (@farahkhad) is a photographer based in Nairobi, Kenya. “Some days I don’t wake up feeling like a wet rag. When this happens, I muster enough energy to do a face mask, paint my nails, and gab with my best friends around the world over non-virus related issues. These days are becoming more frequent and when I feel a bit more of myself coming back.”

Laurence Philomene (@laurencephilomene) is a freelance photographer based in Montreal, Canada. “Self-portrait shot while taking a bath with an orange bath bomb. Shot in my home in Montreal, Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, as part of my ongoing project ‘Puberty.’”

 

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