The resulting sculptures are undulating, soft, organic forms made of interwoven wire. Both delicate and durable, we are able to look through and inside of the hanging works, as well as examine their shadows, which create equally intriguing forms. Bridging craft and modern art, pushing the boundaries of positive and negative space, and mixing what is traditionally masculine and feminine, her alluring sculptures defy easy categorization.

Asawa went on to teach and advocate for art education throughout her career. She lived most of her life in San Francisco, where she was an active member of the arts community and founded several art schools, including the San Francisco School of the Arts, now called the Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts.





Source link